Roads of Gann Republic

From OpenGeofiction Encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Gann Republic road numbering scheme is influenced by a mix of different real-life countries. As I've started over with my map, I've decided to rethink my roadway strategy.


Roadway Numbering

Spine Routes: Routes 1-10

These are the primary "trunk" or "spine" routes within the Gann Republic. These routes originate in the National City Center of the Capitol Region, branching off the Capitol Harbor Way distribution roadway. Routes 10 and 50 are the only exception. Route 10 is a primary branch of Route 1 and, while other spinal routes have x0 numberings, Route 10 is considered an inland alternative to the coastal Route 1. Route 50 is a primary branch of Route 5 and is the spine route of the Southeast Coast. These routes can be controlled/limited or full access. Many sections of the Primary "spine" system will be freeway/expressway in nature. Some segments in more urban areas will have the combined characteristics of an arterial and expressway/freeway that (in the US) is coined a "Jersey Freeway". A "Jersey Freeway" is defined as an arterial roadway with full access to residential and commercial areas; but all entrances/exits are right-in/right-out as the median is uninterrupted and there are no traffic signals and cross traffic. U-turns can be made at periodic interchanges. Also frequent on urban sections that are not either full expressway/freeway (including Jersey Freeway) will commonly have left turn restrictions, whereby all turns will be funneled onto a "jughandle" - all turns, left or right, would be from a right-hand ramp diversion to the cross road.

Roadway Map Classifications: Trunk and Primary The routes are as follows:

1. Route 1: Follows the North Coast and terminates at Eastport.

2. Route 2: Crosses the boundary between North and East Coastal plain and Piedmont region to the Southeast Coast, terminating at New Brighton.

3. Route 3: Crosses the piedmont and traverses the Coastal Range to access the Southeast Coast. Terminates at Shoreham-on-Dee.

4. Route 4: Traverses the Cornwall River valley and surrounding geography (wetlands, ridges, etc.). Terminates at Liverpul.

5. Route 5: Follows the St. Gann River valley to Clarksburgh. Then traverses the ridge-and-valley region of the nation's midsection. Upon reaching Lancaster County of the Lancaborough state, Route 5 begins to follow the East and South Coasts until terminating at Newport.

6. Route 6: Follows the edge of the St Gann valley to xxx. Follows the St. Gann River to xxx before crossing the dividing ridge between the St Gann and Martin Riversheds. Then follows the Martin River to Deale, where it begins to follow the York River to Richmond City. Crosses the coastal plain west of Yorkbury until crossing Manayunk County of New South Cape. From here, the terrain becomes rolling as the route passes through Manayunk City, then crossing the dividing ridge between the Lower Manayunk and Pennington Riversheds. Briefly follows the Pennington River before paralleling (at a higher elevation and 5-10+ miles NE of) the Brooklyn River before ending at Newport.

7. Route 7: Follows the western edge of the nation's midsection where the terrain is more varied. Terrain relatively flat and rolling until reaching the Orchard River, where the route follows the river upstream branching off approximately 25 miles prior to its headwaters. Crosses primarily tundra until meeting the west shore of the Brooklyn River. Follows the Brooklyn briefly before crossing the South Coast's coastal plain and hill country before terminating at Port Lancaster.

8. Route 8: Runs southwest to the mountainous Northwestern Frontier before turning more southerly and briefly following the national border with Triaquie and running through the mountainous Western Frontier. Upon reaching the Zoayden River, the route follows the river to the South Coast at Canton.

9. Route 9: The only spine route generally heading north and crossing a national border (with Triaquie). First heads southwest to New Baltimore before turning more northerly, following the St. Gann Estuary to Camden. After Camden, the route continues to the Triaquie border.

10. Route 10: Branches off from Route 1 at the eastern end of the National Capital Region and prior to entering the state of Myddlesborough. Follows the north shore coastal plain and fenlands (marshlands and meadows) until terminating at Route 50 in the State of Arundel.

11. Route 50: The primary spine of the Southeast Coast, running from Eastport to Route 5 near New Salford and Manchesterbury.


Spine Branch Routes: Routes 11-49 and 51-99

These are branch routes from the Spine route system (1-9). The trailing digit increases the further you move from the spine route's origin in the Capitol region. Different spinal branch routes can, and often, cross each other. The route pattern is as follows:

1. Routes 11-19 branch from Route 1

2. Routes 21-29 branch from Route 2

3. Routes 31-39 branch from Route 3...and so forth...

Roadway Map Classifications: Trunk and Primary

The Routes are as follows:

1. To be completed in the future

Motorway/Tollway: Routes 100 to 199

These are designated as the National Motorway and Tollway network. All of these routes, as well as many non-motorway Bridges and Tunnels are tolled, and operated by the GannTag Tollway and Crossings Authority. GannTag is an all electronic tolling system whereby tolls are collected either by the use of a subscription Transponder. Photo billing only occurs on Special circumstances (Military Transport, Oversize and Unusual Loads, etc.). TRANSPONDERS ARE REQUIRED FOR ALL GANN REPUBLIC CITIZENS AND VISITORS. Transponders are available at Border Stations, Rental Car shops, all supermarkets, all membership club stores, all Pharmacies, all Toll Authority buildings, and all Ministry of Motor Vehicle Licensing and Management branches. The transponder annual rate is billed monthly in 1/12 installments to the customer's or company's credit card. NO CASH or other forms of payment are possible on the toll facilities as all Tolling is "collected" by overhead gantries instead of traditional toll plazas. Gantries are set up at all motorway entrances and exits; as well as on the mainline designating the boundary between toll and free segments of the motorway; and on the mainline of non-motorway toll crossings. The transponder rates are as follows:

1. Cars: Non-Motorway Crossings Only - G$375 per year

2. Cars: Tollway/Motorway Tolls Only - G$400 per year

3. Cars: Combined Non-Motorway Crossings and Tollway/Motorway Tolls - G$750 per year

4. Rental Cars only available for use on all Toll Facilities: G$75 for up to one month, G$75 each additional month. For international visitors, make sure that your Credit Card is able to accept international charges at the current excnange rate.

5. Trucks: Combined Non-Motorway Crossings and Tollway/Motorway Tolls (sole option) - G$900 per year for 2 axles; plus G$275 per year for each additional axle.

6. Trucks - Oversized and Unusual Loads: Same as above, plus a G$250 surcharge billed by mail to the parent company of the transporting vehicle for EACH use of the facility.

Route Scheme:

1. Route 100 is the semi-orbital for the Capitol Region, and is not tolled. This is the only 1xx road classified as "Primary".

2. Routes 101 through 109 generally follow their related spine route (101 follows 1, 102 follows 2, and so forth).

3. Routes ending with 0 are usually bypass or orbital routes around cities. These routes are also typically free. If there is a significant bridge or tunnel crossing, those sections are tolled.

4. While most secondary bypasses, orbitals and spur routes into/around cities are handled by "Trunk" segments of routes 1-99, there are suffixed routes which act as secondary bypasses/orbitals or as spurs leading into a city. These can be tolled (if tunneled or lengthy viaducts) or free. These routes will branch off of a parent route with a letter suffix - such as 101A, 101B, 110C, etc.

5. Routes 111-119, 121-129, 131-139, 141-149, 151-159, 161-169, 171-179, 181-189, and 191-199 branch off from the parent 101-109 route. They may follow the spine branch route related to 1xx only if the spine branch route is bypassed by a higher-quality roadway (such as a lengthy tunnel used to bypass a mountain crossing; or a major bridge/underwater tunnel spanning a waterway bypassing a longer land-based routing).

Roadway Map Classification: Motorway, Primary (100 only)

Route Descriptions:

1. 100A - Branches from Route 100 and generally follows the boundary between the National City Center and the surrounding districts before rejoining Route 100. This motorway is Free.

2. Future

State Routes: Routes 200-499

Roads which are found and maintained by each state. Route numbers can cross state lines and can be found in multiple states. Some segments in more urban areas will have the combined characteristics of an arterial and expressway/freeway that (in the US) is coined a "Jersey Freeway". A "Jersey Freeway" is defined as an arterial roadway with full access to residential and commercial areas; but all entrances/exits are right-in/right-out as the median is uninterrupted and there are no traffic signals and cross traffic. U-turns can be made at periodic interchanges. Also frequent on urban sections that are not either full expressway/freeway (including Jersey Freeway) will commonly have left turn restrictions, whereby all turns will be funneled onto a "jughandle" - all turns, left or right, would be from a right-hand ramp diversion to the cross road.

Roadway Map Classification: Secondary

Special Coastal Routes - these are long-distance coastal byways. These routes can be full or limited/controlled access; with some lengthy expressway segments. These routes link the various coastal settlements, some of which are not directly served by the Primary/Spinal system. These are as follows:

1. Route 200: Begins in the Eastwick district of the National Capitol Region. Follows the North/Northeast Coast, generally paralleling Route 1. The route terminates in the City of Aberden.

2. Route 300: Begins in Kilmarnoc and follows the coast - including serving Eastport. Follows the Coast, albeit with gaps and diversions inland, to New Salford.

3. Route 400: Begins in Yorkbury. This is a very circuitous route, following the East and South coast and crossing the various inlets slightly inland (crosses Routes 5 and x numerous times). This route crosses into the nation of Rots just west of Hartford.

County Routes: Routes 500-799

Key county-level roadways. Routes can cross county lines and repeat in other counties. Some segments can be limited/controlled-access, but most are full access with or without "turn restrictions" (i.e. jughandles)

Roadway Map Classification: Tertiary

Freeway/Expressway and Arterial Frontage/Service Roads: Routes 800-999

Some freeway/expressway roadways will have frontage/service roads. If the frontage/service roads do not already have a route assigned, these will carry the 8xx route number - where xx is the number of the road that these frontage/service roads are paralleling. Likewise, some major surface arterials (think Queens Blvd in Queens, NYC; and Roosevelt Blvd in Philadelphia, PA) will have "outside" service roads. These too will be numbered related to the route the "mainline" roadways are assigned and carry the 9xx number. Segments between a feeder ramp and the nearest intersecting Primary, Secondary, or Tertiary roadway will take on the characteristic of the "Link" classification of the mainline roadway.

Roadway Map Classification: Minor Road

Municipal Routes: Routes 1000-1999

Major arterial roadways within urban areas which are not Primary, Secondary or Tertiary routes. Will be named "Denton Ave - 823" for example.

Roadway Map Classification - Minor Road

Other Streets and Roads

All other streets, minor rural roads, and residential roadways will have the "Residential" Roadway Map Classification.

True "Service Roads" include shopping center roadways, parking lot asiles, industrial entrance roadways and circulatory roadways, park roadways (aside from streets and numbered roadways running through parks), educational campus roadways, and other non-through traffic roadways will be placed under the "Service Road" Roadway Map Classification(s).

Roadway Classification

Open GeoFiction Default Roadway presets and the relationship to the Gann Republic roadway network.

1. Motorway - represents the Gann Republic's network of Toll Motorways. The junction/interchange frequency is sparse - similar to that of "Turnpikes" in the United States and other toll roads globally - no less than 2 miles (in Urban Areas) to 10 miles (rural areas). These roadways will also cross challenging/mountainous terrain by the use of long tunnels; and large bodies of water by the use of lengthy bridges and/or tunnels. Tunnels are also used in urban areas.

2. Trunk - represents freeway/expressway segments of the Gann Republic's network of Spine/Trunk and Primary Roadways (Routes 1-100). Limited access sections have interchanges/junctions every mile, or more frequently in urban areas.

3. Primary - represents expressway and arterial segments of the Primary/Spine system (Routes 1-100); as well as the National Capitol Region's segments of Routes 1-9 and 100. These segments can be full access (surface) or limited access (such as Route 100). Limited access sections will have frequent junctions. Also, Primary Roads will have more numerous and lengthy sections of "Jersey Freeways". Full access segments will also likely contain "No Left Turn"/"Jughandle" intersections in urban areas.

4. Secondary - represents all State Routes. Contains limited and full access segments; and "Jersey Freeway" segments. Full access segments will also likely contain "No Left Turn"/"Jughandle" intersections in urban areas.

5. Tertiary - represents all County Routes. Contains some limited and mostly full access segments; and, in rare cases, "Jersey Freeway" segments. Full access segments will also likely contain "No Left Turn"/"Jughandle" intersections in urban areas.

6. Minor Roadways - these are Urban/Municipal Major Arterial roadways not assigned to the Trunk/Primary, Secondary, or Tertiary networks; but serve as major trafficked roadways. This also applies to frontage and service roads.

7. Residential Streets - All other parts of the Urban Street network, suburban street network, and all exurban/rural road network.

8. Motorway Link - Represents motorway ramps. Includes roundabouts part of an interchange.

9. Trunk Link - Represents Spine/Trunk limited-access segments ramps. Includes roundabouts part of an interchange.

10. Primary Link - Represents Primary route ramps. Includes Jughandles, Roundabouts, non-90-degree right-in-right-out ramps, and right-turn ramps.

11. Secondary Link - Represents Secondary route ramps. Includes Jughandles, Roundabouts, non-90-degree right-in-right-out ramps, and right-turn ramps.

12. Tertiary Link - Represents Tertiary route ramps. Includes Jughandles, Roundabouts, non-90-degree right-in-right-out ramps, and right-turn ramps.