Aeránanue

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Aeránanue
Aerá
Aeránanue
Pronunciation/ɑiˈʀanɑnwə/
Native toAerágny, Yrasẽmatetã
EthnicityAiranni
Language familyAntarephian
DialectsSiwoni
Casbi
Plourji
Sivére-Aftreaux
Writing systemRomantian Script
Official status
Official language inTemplate:Aerágny, Yrasẽmatetã
OGFL-1ae
OGFL-2aer


Aeránanue is an Antarephian language, and the last alive member of the Jesillian branch of this family. It is the national language of Airannia, as well as being one of the national languages of the Federated Kingdoms of Yrasẽmatetã. It has roughly x million speakers in 2018.


Alphabet

Aeránanue uses the Romantian alphabet. Before the colonization of Aerágny, the language would use its own, elaborate and vertically written alphabet, but this was officially abolished in 1777, while having fallen out of favor much earlier. This results in some of the letters which in the original script were one symbol being romanticized to two letters, but technically still being considered one letter to the language. In 1902, the letter <x> was added to the alphabet, replacing many uses of <ks>, <cch> and <kch> in the language.

Alphabet
Letter Letter Name Pronunciation
A anne /a/, /ɑ/
B by /b/, /p/
CH chan /ʃ/, /ʒ/
D dy /d/
E enne /ɛ/, /e/, /ə/
G ganne /g/, /ʒ/, /x/
DH dhyr /ð/, /θ/
I ice /i/, /ɪ/, /ə/
Y yanne /j/, /i/, /ɪ/
H hyre /h/, /x/
KH khyre /k͡x/
K ky /k/
L lanne /l/
M my /m/
N ny /n/
É él /e/
O otte /ɔ/, /o/
P py /p/
R ranne /ʀ/, /ɹ/
S sace /s/, /ʃ/, /z/
T ty /t/
Á áce /a/
J juq /ʒ/
U uille /u/, /w/
BH bhéde /β/, /pɸ/
NG inge /ŋ/, /nʒ/
V vich /v/, /f/
Q qui /kw/, /kʰ/, /kˀ/, /kj/
C call /k/, /s/, /z/, /ʃ/
SH shuq /ʃ/
F fyre /f/
Ç çy /z/, /g/
LH lhá /ʎʷ/
X yx /kʒ/

Additionally, the language has a number of diphthongs (and a single triphthong)

Diphthongs
Diphthong Pronunciation
eo /jo/
io /jo/
oe /oʊ/
ae /ɑɪ/
ai /aɪ/
ou /u:/
au /o:/
eau /o:/
eu /ø/
ei /ẽ/
oi /wɑ/
ie /i:/

Pronunciation

Vowel Modes

Vowels in Aeránanue, except for <á>, <é>, <u> and the diphthongs, have two modes, a "short" and "long" variant. Which is used is determined by the location of the vowel in the word, and the surrounding consonants. For these purposes, <x> and <kh> counts as two consonants.

Vowel Modes
Vowel Long Mode Short Mode Is long if Examples
<a> /a/ /ɑ/ If in the final syllable, cannot be followed by any consonants. If not in the final syllable, can be followed by at most one consonant. Also, not followed by <ng> or <gn>. bal /bɑl/
bala /bala/
bagni /bɑɲi/
<e> /e/ /ɛ/ Word final <e> is unpronounced, but counts as a syllable for the sake of pronunciation rules, unless preceded by <u>, <gn>, or three consonants, in which case it is short. Cannot be elongated in the final syllable. Can be followed by at most one consonant in other syllables, except if that consonant is <ch>, a <c> pronounced as /s/, <ng> or <gn>. bure /buʀ/
beri /beʀi/
berdi /bɛʀdi/
bechi /bɛʃi/
/i/ /ɪ/ If in the final syllable, cannot be followed by any consonants. In other syllables, can be followed by at most one syllable. Is always short if followed by <ng> or <gn>. If word-initial, short <i> is pronounced as /ə/. Becomes /j/ if followed by another vowel. bir /bɪʀ/
biré /biʀe/
bird /bɪʀd/
int /ənt/
bich /bɪʃ/
<o> /o/ /ɔ/ If in the final syllable, cannot be followed by any consonants. In the other syllables, can be followed by at most one syllable. Also, not followed by <ng> or <gn>. bol /bɔl/
boli /boli/
bolt /bɔlt/
bogni /bɔɲi/

The letters U and Y

In Aeránanue, the letters <u> and <y> are both vowel and consonant, depending on their surroundings.

U

The letter <u> is pronounced as /u/ as a vowel, and /w/ as a consonant. It is only a consonant if followed by a vowel (which could also be another <u>). Followed by a consonant or word-final, it is a vowel.

For example: pum /pum/ puo /pwo/ apu /apu/ apui /ɑpwi/

Y

If the letter <y> is either preceded or followed by a vowel, it is a consonant, and is pronounced /j/. In all other cases, it is a vowel, and is pronounced as /i/ word-finally, or when followed by <r>. In all other cases, it's pronounced /ɪ/.

For example: yán /jan/ ayán /ɑjan/ náy /naj/ ány /ani/ ányn /anɪn/ ynán /ɪnan/

The letters C and Ç

The letters <c> and <ç> differ in pronounciation depending on the following letter. For <c>, it is pronounced as /k/ when followed by an <a>, <á>, <o>, <u>, <y> (except when word-final), a consonant, or word-finally. It is pronounced as /s/ (or /z/ word-initially) in all other cases. The letter <ç> is pronounced as /z/ in all instances, except when followed by <u>; <çu> is pronounced as /gw/ if followed by a vowel. If word final, <çe> is pronounced /ʒ/

For example: acter /ɑktɛʀ/, acer /asɛʀ/, acar /akɑʀ/, acya /akja/, acy /asi/, ac /ac/,

For example: raçum /ʀazum/, raçui /ʀɑgwi/, raç /ʀɑz/, raçe /ʀaʒ/,

The letter R

The letter <r> is pronounced as /ʀ/ in all instances, except when its space is reversed with a word-final <e> - while word-final <er> is pronounced /ɛʀ/, word-final <re> is pronounced /ɛɹ/.

For example: banner /bɑnɛʀ/ bannre /bɑnɛɹ/

The letter Q

The letter in nearly all instances is followed by <u> - together forming a /kw/ sound, and counts as two consonants. When <qu> is followed by an <i>, it is pronounced /kʰ/. If <qu> is followed by a consonant, it will produce a /kju/ sound, however. Thirdly, <que> word-finally is pronounced /k/. Lastly, word-finally is pronounced as /kˀ/.

For example:

aqua /ɑkwa/ áqua /akwa/ áqui /akʰi/ áqus /akjus/ áque /ak/ áq /akˀ/

Stress

Stress on words in Aeránanue generally falls on the second-to-last syllable, except in the case of a word with two syllables, in which case it falls on the final syllable. However, any syllable containing the letter <á> will receive the stress. If there are multiple <á> in a word, the last instance will be stressed. The same is true for <é>, although syllables with <á> take priority.

Grammar

Word Order

Aeránanue uses a VSO word order, meaning the first word in a simple sentence is the verb of the sentence, followed by the subject, and then the object. However, in the case of questions, the question word is the first word in a question, and if either object, subject or another noun is attached to the question, these will also be ordered before the verb. Additionally, adverbs that pertain to the verb will be ordered before the verb.

Verbs

Verbs in Aeránanue have conjugations for first, second and third person, singular and plural, and positive and negative in each tense. The possible tenses are: Present, Past, Future, Near Past (Cessative), Near Present (Habitual) and Near Future (Inchoative). Additionally, each word has a passive stem, which can be constructed with a certain set of rules, and an both a positive and a negative imperative form.

Nouns

Nouns in Aeránanue do not have traditional declensions. Plural for verbs is constructed by appending either <er> (if the noun ends in a consonant), or <re> (if the noun ends in a vowel) at the end. However, some special rules apply:

  • Nouns ending in will have the replaced with <cter> for the plural form: bindáq -> bindácter (guardian)
  • Nouns ending in <que> will have the <que> replaced with <cre> for the plural form: dhinque -> dhincre (choice)
  • Nouns ending in <c> will have <re> appended to them for the plural form: acsiéc -> acsiécre (savior)
  • Nouns ending in <x> will have <ir> appended to them for the plural form: ordoux -> ordouxir (despair)
  • Nouns ending in a vowel <y> will have the <y> replaced with <ier> for the plural form: duocty -> duoctier (criticism)
  • Nouns ending in <es> will have the <es> replaced with <res> for the plural form: lugges -> luggres (dove)
  • Nouns ending in <e> will have the <e> replaced with <re> for the plural form: sytse -> sytsre (lance)
  • Nouns ending in a <r>, preceded by a vowel, will have that vowel removed and <é> appended to them for the plural form: voltar -> voltré (discussion)
  • Nouns ending in <gne> will have the <gne> replaced with <nger> for the plural form: asquigne -> asquinger (discovery)
  • Very rarely, some nouns will have irregular plural forms: arres -> arrés (table)

Pronouns

Pronouns in Aeránanue do not use gender - there are pronouns for first, second and third person, singular and plural. Additionally, each such pronoun has its own irregular genitive form.

Pronouns
Pronoun Aeránanue Genitive
First Singular (I) dhá dhánne
Second Singular (you) nis ninne
Third Singular (he/she/it) máne
First Pluar (we) gále gánne
Second Plural (you) have hande
Third Plural (they) áye áyenne

Adjectives

Adjectives in Aeránanue are placed behind the noun they refer to. All adjectives consist of a stem, a connecting vowel and end in <y>. If the noun they are referring to is plural, <er> is appended to the end of them. The connecting vowel of an adjective may be any vowel, except <i>.

Adverbs

Adverbs are placed in front of the adjective or verb they refer to. While a lot of adverbs are made from an adjective stem, a reasonable amount of adverbs without this regular construction exist. To create an adverb from an adjective, the stem and connecting vowel are appended with <tte>.

Postpositions

All adpositions in Aeránanue are postpositions, which are attached to the end of the noun they refer to. The most common adposition is -enn, which means "of", indicating a genitive.

Map Relevant Lexicon

Some words that are of use when reading an Aeránanue map with their pronounciation and meaning.

(w.i.p.)

A more complete dictionary may be found here: [1]