Lathonian

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Lathonian
Latoniu snekta
Native toKeira
RegionTuyaria
EthnicityLathonians
Native speakersTBD
Language familyUletarephian
Early formsProto-Skarvian
  • Proto-Cartino-Skarvian
    • Old Lathonian
      • Middle Lathonian
        • Lathonian
DialectsSkarvennian
Ulinnic
Igrian
Varugian
Heivian
Writing systemRomantian script (Lathonian alphabet)
Official status
Official language inKeiraFlag v4.1.png Keira
IgriaFlag v1.png Igria
Minority language inMerhalia


Lathonian is a Skarvian language mainly spoken in Tuyaria. It is co-official language in Keira and Igria. It is the most widely spoken in the Keiran states of Skarvennia, Nehmenta and North Ulinnia; as well as the Igrian states of Thrallfields and Yapsada. Lathonian is the most similar to other Skarvian languages within the Cartino-Skarvian branch, such as Littic.

Orthography

Alphabet

Glyphs Name Name pronunciation Notes on usage and pronunciation
A, a a /ɑ/ The most common standard pronunciation is either /ʌ̆/ if short or /äː/ if long.
Ā, ā īlkoina a /ɑː/ In some dialects "aa" is used instead.
Ą, ą noisina a /ˈnoisɪnʌ ɑː/ ; /ɑː/ /ɑː/ or /ɑ/ in most cases. It's mainly exclusively a written letter as it's phonetically the same as the aforementioned vowels. It's mostly used for accusative grammatical cases.
Ä, ä ä /æ/ The pronunciation can be short /æ̆/, long /æː/, or something in between. It varies from word to word.
B, b bė, bee /beː/ [b]. In some dialects - such as Varugian - it's either pronounced /p/ or completely replaced by the letter P.
D, d dė, dee /deː/ In present standard language, d stands for [d], but it may be pronounced as [d̥] or [t̪] depending on the dialect.
E, e e [e] The pronunciation can vary between [e] and [æ]. Sometimes, the short pronunciation is [ɛ] or [e̞].
Ė, ė ė, ee [eː] [eː] - identical to Kalmish "Ä". In some dialects "ee" or "ie" are used instead.
Ē, ē īlkoina e /æː/ /æː/
Ę, ę noisina e /æː/ The pronunciation can vary and be the same as any of the above E-based vowels. It's mainly exclusively a written letter as it's phonetically the same as the aforementioned vowels. It's mostly used for accusative grammatical cases.
F, f äf /æ̆f/ [f]. Occurs mainly in new loanwords. In every day speech, in most dialects, it's often treated as a V and thus pronounced [v].
G, g gė, gee /ɡeː/ [ɡ]
H, h /hɑː/ [h]. Similar to Ingerish "hide" but harder.
I, i trumpoina i /ɪ/ Almost exclusively a short /ɪ/ with rare exceptions.
Ī, ī īlkoina ī /iː/ /iː/ without exception.
J, j /jɑː/ [j], such as the Ingerish consonant y, without exception.
K, k /kɑː/ [k]
L, l äl, el /æɫ/ [ɫ], [l]
M, m äm, em /æm/ [m]
N, n än, en /æn/ [n]
O, o oo /oː/ Varies between /ɔ/ and /oː/.
Ö, ö öö /øː/ Varies between /œ/ and /ø/.
P, p pė, pee /peː/ Hard [p] or soft [pʲ].
R, r är, er /ær/ or /er/ [r] Always a rolled R.
S, s äs, es /æs/ or /es/ Hard [s̪] or soft [sʲ].
T, t tee, tė /te:/ Usually a dental [t̪]
U, u uu, ū /uː/ Varies from [ʊ] to [u]
Ū, ū īlkoina ū /uː/ /uː/
Ų, ų noisina ū /ˈnoisɪnʌ uː/, /uː/ [u] or /uː/. It's mainly exclusively a written letter as it's phonetically the same as the aforementioned vowels. It's mostly used for accusative grammatical cases.
V, v vee, vė /ʋeː/ [v] or [ʋ]
Y, y yy /yː/ [y]