Difference between revisions of "Talk:OGF:Federal States/Collaborative States/Massodeya"

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== Population ==
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Hi! I think we might want to have more variety in population caps in Level 1 counties. Even though the system helps keeps population from overflowing (great job, btw), there's going to be an overwhelming majority of counties that have populations of around 59,900. I would put it from 10,000 to 80,000 or maybe have some special counties that have even less- several counties in Northern Nebraska have less than 1,000 residents, and Loving County, Texas's population is looming somewhere over 100 right now. Just a suggestion, and I hope the Massodeyas go well! :D --[[User:Megacity2005Creator|Megacity2005Creator]] ([[User talk:Megacity2005Creator|talk]]) 21:28, 8 August 2019 (CEST)
 
Hi! I think we might want to have more variety in population caps in Level 1 counties. Even though the system helps keeps population from overflowing (great job, btw), there's going to be an overwhelming majority of counties that have populations of around 59,900. I would put it from 10,000 to 80,000 or maybe have some special counties that have even less- several counties in Northern Nebraska have less than 1,000 residents, and Loving County, Texas's population is looming somewhere over 100 right now. Just a suggestion, and I hope the Massodeyas go well! :D --[[User:Megacity2005Creator|Megacity2005Creator]] ([[User talk:Megacity2005Creator|talk]]) 21:28, 8 August 2019 (CEST)
 
:These counties are also significantly larger than most counties. Loving County, TX is 677 square miles; the smallest West Massodeya county (Two Rivers) is nearly three times that size. Even if Two Rivers County reaches its population cap, the county's density would still be only about 40 persons per square mile, which is pretty consistent (and actually a little more sparse) with rural farming areas in the American Midwest. -[[User:TheMayor|TheMayor]] ([[User talk:TheMayor|talk]]) 17:46, 9 August 2019 (CEST)
 
:These counties are also significantly larger than most counties. Loving County, TX is 677 square miles; the smallest West Massodeya county (Two Rivers) is nearly three times that size. Even if Two Rivers County reaches its population cap, the county's density would still be only about 40 persons per square mile, which is pretty consistent (and actually a little more sparse) with rural farming areas in the American Midwest. -[[User:TheMayor|TheMayor]] ([[User talk:TheMayor|talk]]) 17:46, 9 August 2019 (CEST)
 
::Ah, point taken. But that was just an interesting fact on the side- the main problem I think will be that all the counties will have an extremely similar level of population with no outlier on either side (until 150,000). —[[User:Megacity2005Creator|Megacity2005Creator]] ([[User talk:Megacity2005Creator|talk]]) 19:27, 9 August 2019 (CEST)
 
::Ah, point taken. But that was just an interesting fact on the side- the main problem I think will be that all the counties will have an extremely similar level of population with no outlier on either side (until 150,000). —[[User:Megacity2005Creator|Megacity2005Creator]] ([[User talk:Megacity2005Creator|talk]]) 19:27, 9 August 2019 (CEST)

Revision as of 03:29, 16 August 2019

Population

Hi! I think we might want to have more variety in population caps in Level 1 counties. Even though the system helps keeps population from overflowing (great job, btw), there's going to be an overwhelming majority of counties that have populations of around 59,900. I would put it from 10,000 to 80,000 or maybe have some special counties that have even less- several counties in Northern Nebraska have less than 1,000 residents, and Loving County, Texas's population is looming somewhere over 100 right now. Just a suggestion, and I hope the Massodeyas go well! :D --Megacity2005Creator (talk) 21:28, 8 August 2019 (CEST)

These counties are also significantly larger than most counties. Loving County, TX is 677 square miles; the smallest West Massodeya county (Two Rivers) is nearly three times that size. Even if Two Rivers County reaches its population cap, the county's density would still be only about 40 persons per square mile, which is pretty consistent (and actually a little more sparse) with rural farming areas in the American Midwest. -TheMayor (talk) 17:46, 9 August 2019 (CEST)
Ah, point taken. But that was just an interesting fact on the side- the main problem I think will be that all the counties will have an extremely similar level of population with no outlier on either side (until 150,000). —Megacity2005Creator (talk) 19:27, 9 August 2019 (CEST)