National symbols of Guai

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National symbols of Guai are the symbols that are used in Guai and abroad to represent the country and its people.

List of symbols

Symbol Image Declared
National flag Flag of Guai.svg March 28, 1924
Seal of Guai Seal of Guai March 28, 1924
National anthem Ios Guai
National colours
  Guaiian Green - #009999
  Yellow - #ffff00
December 31, 1924:
National tree Mimosa2007.JPG
Acacia Guaiana Regis
17th century
National fruit Quince (10889s).jpg
Quince
17th century
National animal Trumpeter Swan (24622845326).jpg
Antarephian swan

National flags

History

Flag of Guai

The national Flag of Guai has been in used since the late 17th century and but was officially formalized as the national flag of Guai only in 1924.

The ratio is prescribed by the March 28, 1924 Law as follows:

The flag to be flown on land by the citizens of Guai or their representatives, whether part of the National Council, the Council of State or any body or agency established by Law or Decree, shall be designed as follows:

  • 18 parts for the width and 27 parts for the length shall depict a rectangle of green similar to the foliage of the National Tree
  • A yellow hāni, inscribed in a square, the side of which is 14 part-long, shall be charged at the centre of the rectangle

The flag to be flown on the sea by the citizens of Guai should be designed as follows:

  • 18 parts for the width and 36 parts for the length shall depict a rectangle of green similar to the foliage of the National Tree
  • A yellow hāni, inscribed in a square, the side of which is 14 part-long, shall be charged at the centre of the rectangle

The flag to be flown on the sea by the representative of citizens of Guai or any body or agency established by Law or Decree, shall be designed as follows:

  • 36 parts for the width and 45 parts for the length shall depict a rectangle.
  • A hāni, inscribed in a square, the side of which is 28 part-long, shall be charged at the centre of the rectangle
  • The rectangle shall be prolonged two triangles, the right angle of which should be placed along the fly of the rectangle. They shall be 27 part-long and their opposite top should reach a line passing through the middle of the central petals of the hāni.
  • For the flag flown by the Navy the rectangle and the triangles shall be dark-red and the hāni white.
  • For the flag flown by any other representatives or any body or agency established by Law or decree, the shades shall be those prescribed for the flag flown on land.

The Council of State shall decree by December 31, 1924:

  • For the all flags, the correct shades and specifications for the design of the hāni, provided it respects the established customs and traditions of Our Nation.
  • For the flags to be flown on the sea by the civil representatives of Guai or the Navy, the correct specifications of the design, provided it respected the established customs and traditions of Our Nation.

Basically, through this law, the National Council was ordering the Council of State to make official the specifications for the National flags of Guai and halt any unwanted variation of design.

Symbolism

Acacia Guaiana Regis being the national tree of Guai, the glaucous green field represents its leaves while the stylized central yellow form stands for its flower or hāni.

List of national flags

The Council of State has provided specifications for the national flags on various occasions: first in 1924 following the aforementioned law, and more recently in 1998 to update the references for the shades of green, yellow and red used on the flags. Yet, the official specifications for the designs, such as the proportions, have never changed since the first decree.

Flag Date Use Description
Flag of Guai.svg 1924-present State and civil flag Ratio 2:3 or 18:27, the hāni being inscribed in a 14:14 square
Civil Ensign of Guai.svg 1924-present Civil ensign Ratio 1:2 or 18:36, the hāni being inscribed in a 14:14 square
State Ensign of Guai.svg 1924-present State ensign Ratio 1:2 or 36:72. Without the swallowtail: 36:45, the hāni being inscribed in a 28:28 square centred on the latter.
Naval Ensign of Guai.svg 1924-present Naval ensign Ratio 1:2 or 36:72. Without the swallowtail: 36:45, the hāni being inscribed in a 28:28 square centred on the latter.

Seal of Guai

Seal of Guai

The Seal of Guai displays a golden rendition of the national flower, the hāni against a Taukan blue shield, a shade of deep blue traditional among the Taukan folk culture. The traditional seal is surrounded by a wreath of hāni or golden wattle. The shield edge with gold.

The current specifications were made official in 1924.


The seal appears on official documents issued by the Guaiian Government or Administration, such as laws, patents, national identity card or passports. In most of the situation involving ink-stamping, the seal is depicted without the shield with gold replaced by ink colour.

Subnational flags

Cantonal flags

Each of the 13 Cantons and 2 special Districts has its own flag. As the National Flag, the ratio of cantonal flags is 2:3 with the same proportions of the central charge when only a single one is used.

Flag Rov/Poro Description
Flag of Astel.svg Astel Design in 1928, the flag of Astel depicts golden ears of unspecified cereals, reflecting in one of the many lakes and ponds doting the Canton. At that time, Astel was essentially an agricultural Canton, hence the use of green for the field. Beforehand, Astel had no traditional emblem as it was, during most of its previous history, parted between the Republic of Pirindi and the Republic of Taupa.
Flag of Hong.svg Hong Dating from 1931, the flag of Hong depicts the traditional cantonal emblem, a pine tree, encircled by Hong repeated 16 times and written in the old Guaiian Abugida. 16 stands for the 16 former Common Lands of Hong and Venetian red has always been the traditional colour of the area.
Flag of Iap.svg Iap Iapan flag is an adaptation of the banner of the defunct Republic of Keroli. The seal in the centre represents the Eight Virtues of the Council of the Elders which governed the Republic. On the Republic banner, the seal was white against a burgundy field. On the modern rendering, the number of virtues has been doubled to indicate that they are those of the People of Iap as well.
Flag of Ítama.svg Ítama Ítaman flag was made official in 1972 but traces its origin to the emblem of the Republic of Kūra for both colours and design. The central flower-like design bears no name nor description but is likely to be another, local representation of the Eight Virtues.
Flag of Karnaki.svg Karnaki The flag depicts a píngao (/'piŋgaɔ/), an apricot blossom, the cantonal flower.
Flag of Kinar.svg Kinar The flag of Kinar is a modern interpretation of the banner of the Republic of Taupa which it was once a part of. Contrary to the modern County of Taupa, the traditional colours have been kept. The seal is slight off-centred toward the hoist so that it appears centred when the flag is flying.
Flag of Kokin.svg Kokin The flag of Kokin derives from the banner of the Republic of Keroli which it is was once part of. The central seal of the Eight Virtues stands for the ancient vassal Republic of Uari, while the 10 seals around it represent the 10 Commons Lands of Uari. White stands from purity and blue for the waters of River Kaita.
Flag of Matal.svg Matal The flag of Matal represents the bow of a white fishing skiff coming back into the harbour. In Guaiian heraldry, ships going out are depicted lateral. The skiff stands for fishery on which Matalian economy was once based.
Flag of Poka.svg Poka The flag of Poka was created in 1961 when Poro Pirindi was detached from the canton. The hāni flower, the traditional symbol of the canton was in fact that of the City of Pirindi. Quince, the national fruit was chosen instead and depicted in the middle of a quince blossom.
Flag of Táriao.svg Táriao The flag of Táriao displays one of the traditional renditions of Aspra Shield with golden fastenings against of field of jade green, the traditional colour of the canton.
Flag of Taupa.svg Taupa The Flag of Taupa is strongly influenced by banner of the Republic of Taupa. The change of colours happened in the second half of the 19th Century and the Sack of Taupa and Bimars by the Sabishiians in 1831. Raspberry pink stands for blooming again over ashes represented by the silver-coloured field.
Flag of Uloa.svg Uloa The flag of Uloa depicts a gwrón (/go'ɾɔn/), a traditional Taukan representation of the Sun Path, on a blue field standing for the sky. The 25 golden solar spirals are intertwined, 24 successive ones stand for the 24 hours of the day, the 25th links up to the days to come as the first hour of the next day.
Flag of Urán.svg Urán The flag of Urán displays a lúo (/'luɔ/), a Guaiian poppy. Guaiian poppy was quite popular in the aesthetic of the Golden Age and appeared on numerous coins, mosaics, paintings and other works of art. It stands for plenteousness as it blooms by the thousands in the early spring.
Flag of Poro Pirindi.svg Poro Pirindi The flag of Poro Pirindi displays a hāni (/'hɑ:ni/), a Acacia Guaiana Regis tree or golden wattle. The green field stands for the foliage of the aforementioned tree.
Flag of Poro Vai.svg Poro Vai The flag of Poro Vai is almost similar to the former municipal flag of Vai. The upper and lower borders pattern stands for the harbour (vai in Guaiian) and the three lúo (/'luɔ/)flowers, a Guaiian poppy. It alludes to the fact that Poro Vai was, until 1961, part of Urán whose flag displays a single lúo. The three flowers stand as well for the three captains who ruled Vai at the time of the Republic of Pirindi: one envoy from Pirindi Council of the Elders, one representing Vai Corporation of Seafarer and one for the burghers of the city.

Historical flags

Flag Date Use Description
Banner Republic of Keroli.svg 12th Century - 1791 Republic of Keroli The seal in the centre of the banner represents the Eight Virtues of the Council of the Elders which governed the Republic of Keroli. White stands for purity and burgundy red for strength and courage. The Eight Virtues are traditionally listed as: Courage, Rectitude, Benevolence, Loyalty, Diligence, Humility, Temperance and Respect.
Banner Republic of Kūra.svg 15th Century - 1791 Republic of Kūra The seal in the centre of the banner is likely to represent the Eight Virtues. Shaped as a flower, it bears neither name nor description. It appeared at the end of the 15th Century on the banner of the Republic. The banner has always been depicted with a swallowtail, usually ending Guaiian flags at sea. It is unsure whether the very banner ever waved on the land.
Banner Republic of Pirindi.svg 11th Century - 1791 Republic of Pirindi The origin of the seal in the centre of the banner is quite unclear but it is likely to represent the Union of the Twelves, a Twelve used to be one of the early divisions of the Republic of Pirindi. The red border, added later, has been depicted in registers since ,at least, the late 15th century. It seems this addition aimed at enhancing the visibility of the banner at sea. The modern Canton of Ítama reused the design in 1972, without the swallowtail and with a modern rendition of the colours.
Flag of Republic of Taupa.svg 15th Century - 1791 Republic of Taupa The seal in the centre represents a unspecified flower, standing for the main Temple of the ancient city of Taupa - present days Bahma-Erén - surrounded by three rows of city walls. The dark crimson of the field and saffron of the seal have traditional been the colours of the Temple of Taupa. Their significance is unknown.