Talk:World geology

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A place to discuss issues of geology, plate tectonics, etc. --Isleño (talk) 22:39, 15 August 2014 (CEST)


We should make a map of relief with every user. -- Clik (talk) 10 October 2015

That sounds great! BelpheniaProject (talk) 06:58, 11 October 2015 (CEST)


plates may be so?

Plattentectonik
--Histor (talk) 23:52, 15 August 2014 (CEST)






Plate Tectonics by country

Pretany/Western Uletha
Bhj867 (talk) 19:31, 10 October 2015 (CEST)

Geologic time scale

Taking our cue from then Real World, I would propose dividing up the geologic history of the planet along the same lines as the nomenclature, dates, and standard colour codes set forth by the International Commission on Stratigraphy - with some very minor modifications.

The subdivisions of geologic time could follow the same as Earth:

  • Eons (unchanged in name and date)
  • Eras (unchanged)
  • Periods - These can be changed, but I would like to propose that names start with the same letter, thereby keeping the mnemonics ie. C-O-S-D-C-P-T-J-C
  • Epochs - Simplified to be all known as early - middle - late
  • Ages - ???

As I proposed above, the dates and colours used to identify the geologic history of the planet would remain unchanged. Thoughts? Turnsole80 (talk) 05:34, 14 June 2017 (CEST)


I have some ideas for the names of the periods:

  • Camoric
  • Oltharic
  • Sunavic
  • Dambian
  • Catrethian
  • Paloric
  • Tassanic
  • Junaric
  • Covalthus

as for the PNQ:

  • Praterian
  • Nolhadic
  • Quateric

Hope you like them! Geoboi (talk) 22:07, 13 June 2017 (PST)


I do! That's a good start to get the conversation going. I also forget to add the three most recent periods, which are lettered P-N-Q! In the meantime, I might add a diary entry to elicit some more interest. Turnsole80 (talk) 23:38, 14 June 2017 (CEST)

Would eras and periods be marked with extinctions and geological events, like the real world? This may interfere with the already established geologies of some countries, although this is unlikely given that no one appears to care much about geology. Continental drift and the positioning of continents plays a role in this. I believe we need to establish some kind of paleogeography first, and some defined plate tectonics before that, before we move too far.Yuanls (talk) 11:50, 15 June 2017 (CEST)


Its a nice idea to have an 'in-world' timescale - I'd imagined keeping all the dates of the eons, epochs and periods pretty much the same. World geology - including tectonics - needs to be flexible enough to allow that, but the divisions could reflect in-world OGF geological events rather than real world ones (we'd just have to imagine an event that took place at the same time in both worlds Yuanls (!)). Names - I'd stick with real ones as much as possible, except for names taken from real world places. So some names of periods could be different.

Dredged this up from a while back when I was scribbling ideas:

Geological time
RW OGF Notes
Era Period Era Period
Cenozoic Anthropocene
Quaternary
Neogene
Paleogene
Cenozoic Anthropocene
Quaternary
Neogene
Paleogene
Mesozoic Cretaceous
Jurassic
Triassic
Mesozoic Barsas
Dalarman
Shanandan
Paleozoic Permian
Carboniferous
Devonian
Silurian
Ordovician
Cambrian
Paleozoic Kalmian
Schwaldian
Wesman
Ionadalban
Dhobarthian
Tircambrian
Precambrian Precambrian Precambrian Precambrian (Neoproterozoic)

I suppose it is harder not to have the mnemonic, but I think the real world timescale refers too to closely to real world places - and we could also use this as an opportunity to indicate how the timescale was developed by in-world OGF geologists, likely in W.Uletha. --Udilugbuldigu (talk) 18:48, 15 June 2017 (CEST)

Those look good Udi. I would change the names for the Cenozoic periods as well, but otherwise, I like them :) I was thinking that two of the five major extinction events would occur at the end of each Era (Paleozoic and Mesozoic). I don't know about dates, but I would assume they'd be pretty similar? Turnsole80 (talk) 04:04, 16 June 2017 (CEST)
As regards the naming of these timescales, are any of the RL names are taken from countries? Most seem to be rivers, mountains where important geological evidence was gathered, long gone tribes, occasionally counties and towns. I'd like to suggest we stick to that pattern and use in-world rivers, mountains etc. That way each era can have a story behind its discovery/definition. Also it allows the naming to be spread more realistically across the world. Certainly many eras seem to have been defined by evidence gathered outside of Europe for example. Ruadh (talk) 09:17, 16 June 2017 (CEST)

So, coming back to this. To re-jig it slightly and try and preserve the mnemonic:

Geological time
RW OGF Notes
Era Period Era Period
Cenozoic Anthropocene
Quaternary
Neogene
Paleogene
Cenozoic Anthropocene
Quaternary
Neogene
Paleogene
Retained as rw since they are not place-linked
Mesozoic Cretaceous
Jurassic
Triassic
Mesozoic Commonian
Junaric
Tassanic
Junaric/Tassanic based on suggestions by Geoboi
Paleozoic Permian
Carboniferous
Devonian
Silurian
Ordovician
Cambrian
Paleozoic Ponentian
Carboniferous
Dalarman
Shanandan
Oxzpocotan
Clistian
Names based on places (mainly mountains) in Latina, Roantra and Wesmandy
Precambrian Precambrian Preclistian Preclistian
Taken from places in the old world, mostly mountains rivers and regions rather than cities (hard to find many tribes or mountain names matching up on the map). The rw Cenozoic names aren't based on places, rather historical development of the timescale. We could change them, but it would be better not to base them on anything on the map, rather develop our own terms if need be.--Udilugbuldigu (talk) 19:52, 19 July 2017 (CEST)
Udi, these are amazing :) These are the one's we should use IMO. Additionally, I think we should adopt non-RL terms for the three Cenozoic periods too (Holocene/Anthropocene are epochs, not periods). The Quaternary could reference the cyclic growth and decay of continental ice sheets, for example? Turnsole80 (talk) 22:52, 19 July 2017 (CEST)
Glad you like them! (and yes Pleistocene/Holocene/Anthropocene equate to the Quaternary of course, sorry about that confusion). So what do you reckon for the 3 Cenozoic periods? Here are some thoughts, for quaternary: qinulovani (Georgian for 'icy'). Or is that too 'exotic'? Maybe the neogene and paleogene could relate to the spread of mammals, birds, butterflies - either that or the closing of some of the continental isthmuses - like Mecyna, similar to the joining of N & S America. A few random ideas: butterfly = pepela (georgian) or papillon (romance) so might work for paleogene (butterflies appear in fossil record in first epoch of paleogene). For neogene, maybe daffodil nargizi (georgian) or narcissi (romance) would work - daffodils evolved sometime around start of the neogene.--Udilugbuldigu (talk) 00:23, 20 July 2017 (CEST)
That's the perfect sort of link IMO. Name them after something that appeared in the fossil record, or a major geologic event. I have no problem using Georgian, indeed the exotic nature of it makes it perfect for the role! :) Turnsole80 (talk) 01:55, 20 July 2017 (CEST)
Great stuff, taking a lead from the fossil record is a lovely touch. I prefer Papela and Nargizi, in fact all the Georgian suggestions. I must go look up Georgian now :) Ruadh (talk) 09:13, 20 July 2017 (CEST)



So what is the procedure for deciding the names? Do we have a vote? Turnsole80 (talk) 04:49, 19 June 2017 (CEST)

The procedure for deciding the names might be fairly arbitrary ... refer to them in any articles about OGF geology written in Ingerish - for example on country pages - and link to them?--Udilugbuldigu (talk) 19:52, 19 July 2017 (CEST)


Precambrian Periods

RW OGF
Ediacaran Esimarian
Cryogenian Clairissian
Tonian Tonquessian
Stenian Sevaillian
Ectasian Elixitian
Calymmian Calambrosian
Statherian Sobatian
Orosirian Orinian
Rhycian Roatian
Siderian Svaetian

This is my view on naming the Precambrian/Preclistian periods. Most of the names in OGF are based on names of Countries and Mountains around the world. I used this to have some more information on geologic time periods, so everyone can have more knowledge. This list is not the truth, and not meant to be taken as a fact. (Geoc3ladus talk)

Yeah, I like these :) Nice work! --Turnsole80 (talk) 07:26, 7 December 2019 (CET)